Smooth Merge of two objects

#1
Hi guys,

I'm new to cheetah 3d, been learning a lot thanks to these forums!

In my model, I'm trying to make a smooth transition between the legs and the lower torso. The brush tool doesn't seem to be helping smooth out the edges connecting these two objects. I'm trying to make it look like this is one smooth mesh.

Thanks.
 

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frank beckmann

Well-known member
#2
I don´t think that is easy via polygon modelling - topology-wise. (There´s MeshMixer.app which might do what you want)
If you want a continuous mesh you need a continuous edge flow (vertically). You can delete every second edge loop of the legs to adapt the edges of the lower torso. All in all all parts are already in high definition tessellation which makes it hard to find any transition at all.
You can brut force boolean-add all together but this means a comprehensive cleaning up afterwards. The brush-tool should work on that from my experience:
MeltingMeshes.gif


Cheers
Frank
 
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#3
I don´t think that is easy via polygon modelling - topology-wise. (There´s MeshMixer.app which might do what you want)
If you want a continuous mesh you need a continuous edge flow (vertically). You can delete every second edge loop of the legs to adapt the edges of the lower torso. All in all all parts are already in high definition tessellation which makes it hard to find any transition at all.
You can brut force boolean-add all together but this means a comprehensive cleaning up afterwards. The brush-tool should work on that from my experience:
View attachment 34410

Cheers
Frank
I see. Thanks!
 

Helmut

Well-known member
#4
* As I have noted in a different thread on the German desk, the application MakeHuman (free / €$£¥ support is welcome) can save significant time in generating "standard" human topology. There are quite a few customising knobs to create a model (male, athletic, severe erectile dysfunction :eek:...) close to your aim.
* Ex/Im-port with Collada, rigs optional but functional in C3D when imported.
 
#5
What you seem to have in mind indeed isn't possible in Cheetah.

I'm not sure if you know (if so, sorry):

But with bridge you can connect two meshes easily (but both objects should have the same amount of points on the rims for a clean object).

Or if you manage to have the same amount of points at roughly the same position (ideally the same), you can weld the objects together. If it's the same position, you just copy both objects into the same mesh (or use merge, see manual) and then clean the mesh up with optimize. Otherwise (or if something is left) you have to use weld for each set of points.

Both ways are much more easy with less polys then you already have.

Some other (much more expensive) apps have such a possibility where you can weld 2 meshes together. You can bring together any meshes you want, adding or subtracting, hit a button and your mesh is finished. At least in some apps you can even change the objects later on. You have in the end one mesh with a maybe not perfect but quite good all-quad topology. Sounds great, and it is, but it's mostly for hardedge modeling, needs a lot of planing and usually results in a very dense mesh that's not easy to work on afterwards. In your case it would result in a dense mesh with probably bad and visible seams.

One other reason to follow Helmut's advice is this: If you really want to create a realistic human figure you should have the necessary knowledge of anatomy (like when you want to draw a convincing human). MakeHuman and Poser/DAZ figures are already there and usually already much better than most of us can create themselves.

If you on the other hand want to create an alien, an orc or some other humanoid figure not existing in reality then those figures can help having in the background as 3dimensional reference.
 
#7
Now that´s a statement. :eek::D
As I wasn't really sure if he knows how to connect two meshes the usual way I somehow thought that it was necessary to make clear that I don't contradict you before mentioning how one could connect meshes. Sorry if I somehow managed to stand on your feet with that sentence, wasn't intentional in any way.

Aside from MeshMixer which I named already you´re probably talking about sculpting apps?
You probably mean Zbrush's Mesh Fusion, which is some boolean with fused together meshes in the end, no sculpting involved (with zbrush you can polymodel, but it's working different from the usual modeler apps). The result is quite clean, actually usable for hard and soft edge modeling and together with the auto retopo tools all-quad in the end.

Something similar is incorporated in Maya for years (and meanwhile in 3ds max, but I'm not 100 % sure). I don't know if it's better than Meshmixer or roughly the same.

Last time I looked Blender had at least a way to change the bevels after booleans (via scripts). Not quite the same.

Best in class (and the first one around) is still Modo's Mesh Fusion (Pixologic named their tool the same, but they didn't use the same plugin, instead creating something of their own). First this was available as a plugin (I think for lightwave, too), but it's for years integrated in Modo and further developed. It's something like live booleans where you can change the individual role of the involved meshes (add, subtract or intersect) and the seams (called strips). Actually, it's freaking awesome (but it feels like cheating). You can stick something together in minutes where you with traditional modeling methods need hours. The price you pay is a dense model because it works with subdivision. To a certain degree you can control the subdivision level of the different meshes, meanwhile from 0 on upwards, resulting in lighter meshes then before, but the result is still rather dense. With lots of meshes involved it gets a bit complicated, but you can create things from start to finish just with fusion and prefabricated meshes (some subd-optimized all-quad (not so) 'primitives').

The topology of the resulting Mesh is depending on what you feed it; often all-quad, sometimes some tris in the mix (again, you can use automatic retopology, with automatic guides). Usually you get a cleaner result with the traditional modeling methods. All in all it's better fitted for hard edge modeling, but with careful planing you can fuse together humanoid figures (including humans), very much depending on the parts you model. In the OP's case it wouldn't work out, though.

Sometimes, with such possibilities available, I'm asking myself 'why do I care?', especially as I believe that the days of the traditional 3d modeler (I mean the persons, not the apps) are counted. Stuff like this, procedural modeling, virtual reality and artificial intelligence together will result in ways how someone not knowing what a vertex is can create, texture and render complex 3d models (Adobe's Dimension is just a start), the actual work done by the computer (in the cloud, of course). My crystal ball has a crack, but in my view it's just around the corner (maybe 15, 20 years tops), as long as the climate, megalomaniac politicians with atomic bombs, religious fundamentalists with smaller bombs (of different faiths), total economic collapse and the general stupidity of our whole race don't stop the development of new technologies for a few centuries (or forever).
 
#9
Didn't know that the 'two man-team' were brothers. It already was a work of pure genius, but Mesh Fusion evolved far beyond that meanwhile. Darrel is still working on it.

And actually you were right: I hadn't read the file name ;).

P.S.: Sorry about manhandling the English language again in the post above. It's 'stepped on sbs toes' of course (but sometimes the right expression eluded me at that early time of the day).

P.P.S: Sorry to any reader whose preferred doom-scenario I forgot to mention. New Viruses & old but resistent bacteria, over-population, civil-wars or any mix of the here and above mentioned scenarios are viable too as are meteorites (which would be ironic, as we have invested so much time, energy & ressources in our self-destruction. I still hope to die of old age (shortly before the shit really hits the fan).
 
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